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Anxiety

A Case for Group Therapy?

Although many clients feel as though their compromised emotional states are completely unique, similarities do exist. Often, clients feel ashamed of their inner turmoil and seek out individual therapy to work on a one-on-one basis and minimize the likelihood other swill know how much they genuinely struggle. Individual therapy has significant benefits and is appropriate for almost all forms of mental health treatment, however, group therapy can offer an unmatched and unique form of healing, as individuals can understand they are truly not alone in their suffering. Group therapy utilizes the power of healing through relationships in the present moment. …

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What Does Suffering From Social Anxiety Really Mean?

Approximately 15 million American adults struggle with a debilitating social anxiety disorder, yet fewer than five percent of these individuals seek treatment. Often thought of as “social phobia,” many chalk the symptoms up to being shy, introverted or socially inept, however, the intense fear and discomfort felt in a group setting goes far beyond any personality trait. The disorder can interfere with work, school, interpersonal relationships and overall well-being. Social anxiety disorder is a clinical diagnosis distinguished by crushing anxiety and extreme self-awareness of one’s own actions, demeanor or behavior in ordinary social situations. The chronic fear of being watched …

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Meet Your New Coach and Counselor, Mr. Ed!

Although it is common knowledge that pets such as cats and dogs can provide support and companionship to humans and even increase physical and emotional wellbeing, a new technique is having a remarkable impact on emotional development and team building. Equine Assisted Learning and Growth (“EALG”) and Equine Assisted Psychotherapy (“EAP”) are techniques that utilize horses as an important tool in the coaching and therapeutic processes. When discussing this particular methodology with patients, friends, and family, two questions inevitably arise. First, does the person ride the horse? And second, is the individual conversing with the horse? Surprisingly, there is no …

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Sit Up Straight! The Effect of Posture on Math Performance

A summary of Do Better in Math: How Your Body Posture May Change Stereotype Threat Response Every child has had “Sit up straight! Don’t slouch!” barked at them at least once. While it may come across as an arbitrary demand for attention (and was certainly met with loud sighs and eye-rolls), the request for proper posture may have practical implications, both in and out of the classroom. According to researchers from San Francisco State University and Kaohsiung Medical University, upright and correct spinal alignment can lead to improvements in physical health, positive thinking, and – you guessed it – math …

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Digital Addiction: Increased Loneliness, Anxiety, and Depression

The use of smartphones in our daily lives has increased to the point of widespread digital addiction. The American Society for Addiction and Medicine and the American Psychological Society both recognize behavioral dependency, in addition to dependence on a substance, as indicative of addiction. Similar to substance addiction, digital addiction appears to have some neurological basis of support. Humans have developed automatic reactions to surprising stimuli, and from an evolutionary perspective, this has been beneficial to our survival. However, in the modern world, we are often triggered for this response by digital notifications, creating inherent distractions. When individuals choose to …

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Neurofeedback for Disorders Associated with Criminal Offending

Neurofeedback training has been successfully used in the treatment of a variety of disorders. Existing research has identified EEG frequency deviances in disorders that are associated with criminal offending, such as the following. Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is one of the most well researched disorders that has been treated by neurofeedback training, and also demonstrates some relationship to criminal activity considering its associations with inattention, impulsivity, and lacking inhibitory control. In EEG-based literature, ADHD appears to concern an excess of slow frequencies like delta and theta, as well as reduced beta waves and sensori motor rhythm (SMR). About 60% of …

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Using Neurofeedback to Lower Anxiety Symptoms Using Individualized qEEG Protocols

Anxiety disorders currently affect about 18% of the United States population, reported in women twice as frequently as in men. These individuals suffer from chronic and severe symptoms that interfere with daily functioning. There are many evidence-based treatments for the broad scope of anxiety disorders, including cognitive behavioral therapy, exposure-based treatment, medication, and meditation. Neurofeedback has also been supported by previous research in the treatment of anxiety disorders. Kerson, Sherman, and Kozlowski (2009) trained participants by decreasing alpha waves until they were sufficiently suppressed, and then the focus shifted to improving alpha symmetry. As a result, they found improvements in …

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Alpha-Theta Brainwave Neurofeedback Training: An Effective Treatment for Alcoholics with Depressive Symptoms

Alpha brainwaves are thought to be associated with feelings of well-being. Theta waves are connected to a day-dreaming or pre-sleep state. Beta brainwaves are associated with concentration, or anxiety and confusion. Delta waves indicate sleepiness or sleep. Alcoholics tend to show deficient alpha activity during an eyes-closed relaxed EEG. It is possible that this deficient alpha activity is characteristic of alcoholism and could therefore be used to identify individuals with this predisposition. Research has demonstrated that alpha-theta brainwave neurofeedback therapy is very effective in the treatment of alcoholism, and particularly in achieving abstinence from alcohol. Saxby and Peniston’s (1995) study …

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Neuromodulation and neurofeedback treatments in eating disorders and obesity

As the neurobiological understanding of eating disorders has evolved in recent years, nontraditional treatments involving neurofeedback have been developed. Extreme differences among eating disorders, ranging from severe food restriction to binge eating, may result from differences in one’s neurobiological make-up. Increased understanding of these differences has informed the development of these novel treatments involving neurofeedback. Dalton et al.’s (2017) literature review summarizes the existing researching investigating the efficacy of neurofeedback training, along with other neuromodulation interventions, in the treatment of various eating disorders. Neurofeedback training as an intervention for eating disorders has been explored in two randomized controlled trials. In …

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Neurofeedback: A noninvasive treatment for symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder in veterans

One in five veterans returning from Iraq or Afghanistan experience symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Traditional treatments for PTSD include pharmacotherapy with medications and talk therapy, but both are limited. Pharmacotherapy addresses the symptoms of PTSD but produces side effects and does not address the underlying cause of the symptoms. Talk therapy for PTSD often focuses on recalling and re-experiencing traumatic events in an effort to relieve the ongoing symptoms. This recall of traumatic events activates the brain’s limbic system, creating a strong emotional reaction. This reaction can be counter-therapeutic and potentially impair left frontal lobe functioning, impairing self …

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