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Understanding the Bystander Effect

If you saw an indisposed man stumble into an oncoming train and collapse onto the platform, would you do something? If you’re among the nearly 50 people who passed by a similar accident in a Montreal train station last winter, chances are, probably not. Most of us consider ourselves to be caring people who are willing to help others in need. So why is it that when tragedy strikes in the middle of a crowd, no one seems to do much of anything? The reason is a psychological phenomenon known as the bystander effect. To learn more, click here.

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Giving Thanks, Getting Health: The Science of Gratitude

Gratitude is important. We know gratitude as something you show towards other people to appreciate what they do for you. But (perhaps a little ironically) gratitude is also good for the person giving it. The Greater Good Science Center at the University of California, Berkeley recently launched a multi-million-dollar, 3-year project called Expanding the Science and Practice of Gratitude. The goals of the project are to expand the body of scientific research that explores the effects of gratitude, seeks to apply these findings in medical, educational and other fields using the evidence gained, and finally, to expand the cultural conversation surrounding …

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Consequences of Workplace Stress Over Time

Most of us know by now that stress is not beneficial to our health. But many of us do not realize just how much stress really stresses us out. In fact, workplace-related stress is at an all-time high, and health problems related to the stress epidemic are responsible for more deaths each year than Alzheimer’s disease or even diabetes! Thankfully, there are steps you can take to reduce your stress levels, including neurofeedback, which has been proven to help millions of people reduce their stress levels and access feelings of calm, mindful focus. To read more, click here.

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Treatment Strategies for Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is the most common of the anxiety disorders, but many healthcare practitioners believe it is often underdiagnosed. It is an adult-onset disorder with the highest median age of all the anxiety disorders. Characterized by excessive worry that becomes difficult to control for a period of at least six months. It is also usually accompanied by other symptoms such as sleep disturbance, fatigue, muscle tension, difficulty concentrating, irritability, and restlessness. GAD usually begins with an overestimated danger (such as the fear that a loved one will be kidnapped) and gradually pervades other areas of life. There are several ways to …

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Better Than Coffee: Surprising Ways to Boost Energy

By now, most of us are familiar with the morning wake-up blues. Sometimes even after a good night’s sleep, it can be difficult to get alert and ready for the day. Conventional wisdom points to coffee or tea as a good source of caffeine for a morning pick-me-up, but research suggests this may not be as helpful as previously thought. Researchers took a look at some other intriguing ways to boost energy, like chewing gum or even taking sage as a supplement! The results on how caffeine affects us are especially surprising. To read more, click here.

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Two Months After Robin Williams’ Death, Suicide Calls Still High

Many in the mental health community know the risk of suicide rates increasing after the publicized suicide of a well-known celebrity. While the tragic death of Robin Williams is no exception, numerous professionals who operate suicide hotlines across the country note that the current spike in calls has been unprecedented, both in duration and size. For example, immediately following the news of Williams’ death the National Suicide Prevention Hotline reported over double their normal volume of calls, 7,400 per day versus their usual 3,500 — and are still receiving hundreds more calls than normal, even two months later. While this …

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Beyond Willpower: The Science Behind Breaking Bad Habits

How many of us have ever tried to break a bad habit, only to fall back into our old patterns despite our best intentions? This blog by PsychCentral writer Dr. Elisha Goldstein discusses the ways in which habit-forming — and -breaking — is about so much more than willpower. While there is only so much we can do about the unavoidable dopamine rush we get when we see a tasty hamburger or pick up our smartphones, mindfulness practice has been shown to widen the gap between impulse and response in our brains. In addition to treating a wide array of …

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Putting Workplace Stress in Its Place

Stress is one of today’s most pervasive health concerns, affecting tens of millions across the United States and causing an estimated $300 billion in loss every year to the economy. Between diminished productivity, absenteeism and direct medical costs, stress has earned a spot as the World Health Organization’s “health epidemic of the 21st century.” Many workplaces responding to employee stress have developed techniques and programs to help people de-stress throughout the workday, but even if you’re not among the lucky Google employees receiving massage retreats, you can start to minimize your own stress levels anytime! Whether by using neurofeedback, spending …

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qEEG Neurofeedback for Migraines

This study by Dr. Jonathan Walker at the Neurotherapy Center of Dallas examined neurofeedback’s ability to treat migraine headaches. The study focused on 71 patients between the ages of 17-62 who complained of frequently occurring migraine headaches. Researchers found that of these patients, over half (54%) experienced complete cessation of migraines, with another 39% experiencing an over 50% reduction in frequency. Another 4% experienced reduced frequency of less than 50%, and only a single patient reported no reduction in migraine frequency as the result of neurofeedback. In contrast, of the control group which continued on traditional drug therapy, 68% of …

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5 Ways to Cut Stress and Increase Calm

These days, it’s hard to get away from all the stress that comes along with modern living. Here are a few tips to help you fend off stress and its negative effects. 1. Don’t forget to breathe. It seems so simple, but this is one of the most important first steps to slowing down and regaining a sense of balance. Try sitting up straight with your feet level on the floor and your hands resting gently in your lap. Breathe in deeply through your nose and feel your abdomen expand slowly. Sit with this practice for a few minutes at …

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