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Neurofeedback News

Better Than Coffee: Surprising Ways to Boost Energy

By now, most of us are familiar with the morning wake-up blues. Sometimes even after a good night’s sleep, it can be difficult to get alert and ready for the day. Conventional wisdom points to coffee or tea as a good source of caffeine for a morning pick-me-up, but research suggests this may not be as helpful as previously thought. Researchers took a look at some other intriguing ways to boost energy, like chewing gum or even taking sage as a supplement! The results on how caffeine affects us are especially surprising. To read more, click here.

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Two Months After Robin Williams’ Death, Suicide Calls Still High

Many in the mental health community know the risk of suicide rates increasing after the publicized suicide of a well-known celebrity. While the tragic death of Robin Williams is no exception, numerous professionals who operate suicide hotlines across the country note that the current spike in calls has been unprecedented, both in duration and size. For example, immediately following the news of Williams’ death the National Suicide Prevention Hotline reported over double their normal volume of calls, 7,400 per day versus their usual 3,500 — and are still receiving hundreds more calls than normal, even two months later. While this …

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Beyond Willpower: The Science Behind Breaking Bad Habits

How many of us have ever tried to break a bad habit, only to fall back into our old patterns despite our best intentions? This blog by PsychCentral writer Dr. Elisha Goldstein discusses the ways in which habit-forming — and -breaking — is about so much more than willpower. While there is only so much we can do about the unavoidable dopamine rush we get when we see a tasty hamburger or pick up our smartphones, mindfulness practice has been shown to widen the gap between impulse and response in our brains. In addition to treating a wide array of …

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Putting Workplace Stress in Its Place

Stress is one of today’s most pervasive health concerns, affecting tens of millions across the United States and causing an estimated $300 billion in loss every year to the economy. Between diminished productivity, absenteeism and direct medical costs, stress has earned a spot as the World Health Organization’s “health epidemic of the 21st century.” Many workplaces responding to employee stress have developed techniques and programs to help people de-stress throughout the workday, but even if you’re not among the lucky Google employees receiving massage retreats, you can start to minimize your own stress levels anytime! Whether by using neurofeedback, spending …

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qEEG Neurofeedback for Migraines

This study by Dr. Jonathan Walker at the Neurotherapy Center of Dallas examined neurofeedback’s ability to treat migraine headaches. The study focused on 71 patients between the ages of 17-62 who complained of frequently occurring migraine headaches. Researchers found that of these patients, over half (54%) experienced complete cessation of migraines, with another 39% experiencing an over 50% reduction in frequency. Another 4% experienced reduced frequency of less than 50%, and only a single patient reported no reduction in migraine frequency as the result of neurofeedback. In contrast, of the control group which continued on traditional drug therapy, 68% of …

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ADHD: Neurofeedback as an Alternative to Meds

This research article evaluates the growing body of evidence that demonstrates how neurofeedback provides a robust alternative to pharmaceutical medications for treating ADHD. Today, ADHD is the most commonly diagnosed pediatric behavioral health disorder in the United States, and affects adults as well as children. Commissioned by the International Society of Neurofeedback and Research (ISNR), the study notes that while medication and other types of behavioral therapy are approved and commonly used to treat ADHD, their long-term outcomes are relatively poor. In contrast, neurofeedback was found to be “twice as effective as the six other non-pharmacological ADHD treatments that were analyzed.” …

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Using Neurofeedback to Help Rape Survivors

This initiative by neurofeedback practitioner Lanny Fly aims to bring neurofeedback to the Congo. The African country has spent years in a brutal civil war, particularly in its eastern regions, which the UN has deemed “the rape capital of the world.” The trauma of rape has doubtless contributed to tremendous upsurge in anxiety, PTSD and other mental health conditions among survivors. Neurofeedback specialist Fly hopes to use the therapy to help these survivors cope with the trauma and restore a sense of self-worth and normalcy. In the words of Fly’s translator Lidia Hearing, who herself escaped violence in the Congo, …

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The Science Behind Smileys

While the exact date of the first emoticon is uncertain, “smileys” have become so prevalent that many researchers are taking a closer look at how and why we use them. Scientists have observed, for example, that women use smileys more frequently than men, and that using them too soon with a new acquaintance can be off-putting. There are even cultural differences between the most common smileys — for example, 🙂 is most commonly used in the United States to portray a smile, whereas Japanese texters are more likely to opt for ^_^.  It’s a fascinating read about how humans continue …

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Adapting the Law to the Emerging Practice of Neurofeedback

The role of neurofeedback in the context of other medical therapies is growing fast. This article shows some of the legal considerations that must be addressed to ensure that the law keeps up with practice. In the words of leading neurofeedback practitioner Siegfried Othmer, “Neurofeedback cannot succeed as a fringe discipline, or even as a subset of alternative and complementary medicine.” One important issue to address is the notion of “unlicensed practitioners.” While there is a common misconception that some neurofeedback practitioners are not licensed, this is not the case — practicing the therapy without an appropriate license is prohibited …

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Could a Mind-Controlled Google App Help You Meditate?

Concentration and meditation was one of neurofeedback’s earliest applications. Newer technologies have sought to create smaller, lower-cost alternatives for users to access some of neurofeedback’s benefits at home. Now, an app for Google Glass seeks to make the benefits of neurofeedback wearable for seamless use. The app, developed by user experience company MindRDR, works by interacting with the Neurosky EEG biofeedback headband, allowing you to control the app simply by thinking commands. In a world where technology is often a source of constant distraction, the app hopes instead to help individuals improve their focus and concentration. To read more, click …

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