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Neurofeedback Research

Can Neurofeedback Help Addicts Too?

Drawing from the increasing research pointing to neurofeedback as an effective treatment for PTSD, therapists and researchers are now looking to the therapy as a potential treatment for alcohol dependency and drug addiction. Both PTSD and substance abuse share symptoms — including trouble sleeping, irritability, uncontrollable aggression and rage, pain, ringing in the ears, jumpiness, hyperarousal (sensing danger even when none is present), loss of interest, or feelings of isolation. Many PTSD sufferers likewise also suffer from alcohol dependency (52% of men and 28% of women with PTSD) and drug addiction (34% of men and 27% of women with the …

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Using Neurofeedback to Enhance Athletic Performance

This study by Dr. Corydon Hammond, published in the Journal of the American Board of Sport Psychology, explores how neurofeedback can be used to boost performance in athletes of various sports. By quieting and focusing the mind, neurofeedback helps athletes get “in the zone” more easily and stay there, even under immense pressure. In addition, the therapy can help to improve cognitive function after a mild head injury, or help athletes control their emotions in the middle of stressful events. Dr. Hammond also believes the therapy has tremendous untapped potential to help improve physical balance in sports where it is …

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Neurofeedback Studied as Treatment for ADD and Learning Disabilities in Children

ADD and learning disorders are two of the most widespread mental health concerns associated with childhood. There may be a biological and/or hereditary basis for these disorders, and dealing with them can affect children in substantial ways, from how well they perform at school to how well they interact with friends and loved ones. Neurofeedback is emerging as an effective method for improving attention, behavior and cognitive function in children coping with ADD. Several researchers have reported increased IQ scores, better grades and improved performance on academic tests. While more research is needed, EEG biofeedback appears to be a beneficial …

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Can Neurofeedback Fight Muscle Tension?

Low-level muscle tension on a chronic basis is a problem faced by millions. Named dysponesis, this form of covert muscle tension over time can contribute to chronic pain, headaches, exhaustion and difficulty relaxing. This problem is especially prevalent among those who use computers for long periods of time, who may become so absorbed in their task that they are unaware of poor posture or tension affecting their neck, back and shoulders, or may simply be unaware of the tension due to a lack of physical awareness. In this study, researchers used neurofeedback to help participants identify feelings of tension and …

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Neurofeedback for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

This study by Dr. Corydon Hammond explores how neurofeedback may help in the treatment of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, more commonly known as OCD. Past research has found that a pharmacologic treatment of OCD has typically yielded only small improvements for OCD sufferers. In this study, two patients with OCD each underwent tests and surveys to determine the extent of their symptoms, followed by personalized programs of neurofeedback. Not only did both patients experience improvement in their symptoms, but they maintained these improvements over a year after the completion of therapy. While the small number of patients in the study calls …

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Trauma Survivors Find Fresh Hope in Neurofeedback

This article explores the benefits of neurofeedback for trauma survivors and individuals with PTSD. Neurofeedback has come a long way since its early days, when a curious German scientist first explored the concept of using technology to read brain waves in the aftermath of World War I. New research suggests that by using neurofeedback, trauma survivors can regain control of the negative symptoms associated with PTSD, such as hyperarousal (feeling threatened even in the absence of an actual threat), OCD, and more. By helping individuals essentially recalibrate the brain networks involved in emotions and cognition, neurofeedback helps PTSD sufferers find …

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Neurofeedback: Treating the Cause, Not the Symptoms

If you ask someone whether they’ve heard of Prozac, they are more than likely to say yes — yet if you ask someone about neurofeedback, most people aren’t quite as familiar. Neurofeedback has been shown to treat numerous mental health concerns such as depression, anxiety, ADHD, PTSD, and more. Even if you just want to boost your mental performance or focus, it has helped many people to reduce “clutter” in their minds and discover strategies for accessing a state of calmer, more focused awareness. More and more research continues to support neurofeedback’s role in helping individuals treat their mental health …

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Understanding the Bystander Effect

If you saw an indisposed man stumble into an oncoming train and collapse onto the platform, would you do something? If you’re among the nearly 50 people who passed by a similar accident in a Montreal train station last winter, chances are, probably not. Most of us consider ourselves to be caring people who are willing to help others in need. So why is it that when tragedy strikes in the middle of a crowd, no one seems to do much of anything? The reason is a psychological phenomenon known as the bystander effect. To learn more, click here.

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Giving Thanks, Getting Health: The Science of Gratitude

Gratitude is important. We know gratitude as something you show towards other people to appreciate what they do for you. But (perhaps a little ironically) gratitude is also good for the person giving it. The Greater Good Science Center at the University of California, Berkeley recently launched a multi-million-dollar, 3-year project called Expanding the Science and Practice of Gratitude. The goals of the project are to expand the body of scientific research that explores the effects of gratitude, seeks to apply these findings in medical, educational and other fields using the evidence gained, and finally, to expand the cultural conversation surrounding …

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Treatment Strategies for Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is the most common of the anxiety disorders, but many healthcare practitioners believe it is often underdiagnosed. It is an adult-onset disorder with the highest median age of all the anxiety disorders. Characterized by excessive worry that becomes difficult to control for a period of at least six months. It is also usually accompanied by other symptoms such as sleep disturbance, fatigue, muscle tension, difficulty concentrating, irritability, and restlessness. GAD usually begins with an overestimated danger (such as the fear that a loved one will be kidnapped) and gradually pervades other areas of life. There are several ways to …

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