253 North Orlando Ave, Suite 202, Maitland, FL 32751 | (407) 790-4101
Wellbeing

Putting Workplace Stress in Its Place

Stress is one of today’s most pervasive health concerns, affecting tens of millions across the United States and causing an estimated $300 billion in loss every year to the economy. Between diminished productivity, absenteeism and direct medical costs, stress has earned a spot as the World Health Organization’s “health epidemic of the 21st century.” Many workplaces responding to employee stress have developed techniques and programs to help people de-stress throughout the workday, but even if you’re not among the lucky Google employees receiving massage retreats, you can start to minimize your own stress levels anytime! Whether by using neurofeedback, spending …

Continue Reading

qEEG Neurofeedback for Migraines

This study by Dr. Jonathan Walker at the Neurotherapy Center of Dallas examined neurofeedback’s ability to treat migraine headaches. The study focused on 71 patients between the ages of 17-62 who complained of frequently occurring migraine headaches. Researchers found that of these patients, over half (54%) experienced complete cessation of migraines, with another 39% experiencing an over 50% reduction in frequency. Another 4% experienced reduced frequency of less than 50%, and only a single patient reported no reduction in migraine frequency as the result of neurofeedback. In contrast, of the control group which continued on traditional drug therapy, 68% of …

Continue Reading

5 Ways to Cut Stress and Increase Calm

These days, it’s hard to get away from all the stress that comes along with modern living. Here are a few tips to help you fend off stress and its negative effects. 1. Don’t forget to breathe. It seems so simple, but this is one of the most important first steps to slowing down and regaining a sense of balance. Try sitting up straight with your feet level on the floor and your hands resting gently in your lap. Breathe in deeply through your nose and feel your abdomen expand slowly. Sit with this practice for a few minutes at …

Continue Reading

Using Neurofeedback to Help Rape Survivors

This initiative by neurofeedback practitioner Lanny Fly aims to bring neurofeedback to the Congo. The African country has spent years in a brutal civil war, particularly in its eastern regions, which the UN has deemed “the rape capital of the world.” The trauma of rape has doubtless contributed to tremendous upsurge in anxiety, PTSD and other mental health conditions among survivors. Neurofeedback specialist Fly hopes to use the therapy to help these survivors cope with the trauma and restore a sense of self-worth and normalcy. In the words of Fly’s translator Lidia Hearing, who herself escaped violence in the Congo, …

Continue Reading

The Science Behind Smileys

While the exact date of the first emoticon is uncertain, “smileys” have become so prevalent that many researchers are taking a closer look at how and why we use them. Scientists have observed, for example, that women use smileys more frequently than men, and that using them too soon with a new acquaintance can be off-putting. There are even cultural differences between the most common smileys — for example, 🙂 is most commonly used in the United States to portray a smile, whereas Japanese texters are more likely to opt for ^_^.  It’s a fascinating read about how humans continue …

Continue Reading

Could a Mind-Controlled Google App Help You Meditate?

Concentration and meditation was one of neurofeedback’s earliest applications. Newer technologies have sought to create smaller, lower-cost alternatives for users to access some of neurofeedback’s benefits at home. Now, an app for Google Glass seeks to make the benefits of neurofeedback wearable for seamless use. The app, developed by user experience company MindRDR, works by interacting with the Neurosky EEG biofeedback headband, allowing you to control the app simply by thinking commands. In a world where technology is often a source of constant distraction, the app hopes instead to help individuals improve their focus and concentration. To read more, click …

Continue Reading

World Peace Through “Brain-Hacking”?

This article in Forbes discusses ways in which video games may actually have the potential to help build empathy in individuals through their social components. It cites a recent study from the Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology to support this view. In this study, researchers used brain imaging (fMRI) techniques to examine neurological structures in individuals while they played violent video games. What they found was surprising — “there is considerable overlap between the circuits in the brain that process violence and the circuits that process empathy.” Discovery of this binary relationship may have fascinating implications for how we …

Continue Reading

Neurofeedback for Migraines

Anyone who has ever suffered from a migraine knows that the pain — and other associated symptoms — of this disease can be completely debilitating. This article from USA Today includes neurofeedback as one possible treatment. By teaching individuals to make subtle physical changes, such as relaxing particular muscle groups and reducing overall tension, as well as helping to calm the mind and reduce stress, the therapy can offer hope to individuals struggling with these headaches. To read more, click here.

Continue Reading

Reading List: The Neuroscience of Human Relationships

This article explores a new book by Louis Cozolino entitled The Neuroscience of Human Relationships: Attachment and the Developing Social Brain. In the book, the author challenges current predominantly Western notions of “the lone and separate individual” through the lens of neuroscience. He writes that “individual neurons or single human brains do not exist in nature. Without mutually stimulating interactions, people and neurons wither and die.” This approach, thoroughly explored in the book, offers far-reaching implications for a wide variety of disciplines, from art and literature to sociology and science. To read more, click here.

Continue Reading

Neurofeedback and Post-Partum Depression

A new study suggests that neurofeedback may help to increase empathy in humans, including mothers suffering from post-partum depression. Marked by symptoms such as mood swings, anxiety, sadness, difficulty sleeping or concentrating, and irritability, the condition typically affects women within the first 3 months after giving birth, but can sometimes last longer. In this study, researchers believed they could use EEG biofeedback to locate neurological patterns associated with tenderness and affection for loved ones. They then tested whether or not participants could strengthen these patterns — and thereby increase the feelings associated with them — by using neurofeedback. According to …

Continue Reading